Chronological Periods

Late Antiquity

Ammianus Marcellinus Online Project
This site introduces Ammianus and his work by means of a biography, short essays on important persons as well as aspects of his work, and a bibliography of important and recent publications. However, the site is currently under construction; the link above includes an overview of the project. This entry will be updated when possible.

Aphrodias in Late Antiquity
This is the electronic, expanded and revised second edition, originating from the version published by the Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies in 1989. The editions and commentary are by Charlotte Roueché, except for Text 1, by Joyce Reynolds. The electronic editorial conventions were developed by Tom Elliott (EpiDoc), and the website and the supporting materials are the work of Gabriel Bodard, Paul Spence, and colleagues at King’s.

BIBLindex: Références bibliques dans la littérature patristique
An online catalogue of over 400,000 biblical references found in Greek and Latin patristrics from the first through fifth centuries.

Curse Tablets of Roman Britain
Of the provinces of the former Roman empire, Britain is among the most fertile in curse tablets. From such substantial groups of documents, written or at least deposited in the same place, we can recover much information about the traditions of writing curse tablets, the rituals that accompanied the inscribing of curses and the context in which people thought it appropriate to create their curses, potentially a stigmatised activity because of its magical associations. The majority of tablets have come to light in southern Britain around the Severn estuary, but they have also been found in London and Kent, on the Hamble estuary in Hampshire to the south and in the east Midlands and East Anglia. They have been found in towns with cosmopolitan populations and at remote shrines. To judge from the dating evidence of their scripts, tablets were written throughout the period of the Roman presence in Britain, but the predominance of ‘Old Roman Cursive’ among the dated tablets suggest a peak in the second and third centuries AD. Curse tablets are a precious source of evidence for the words and wishes of the town and country people of Roman Britain, albeit expressed in a very particular form. To judge from the names of those who commissioned or wrote them and the items that they seek to recover, the authors of curses are of relatively modest status.

Epigraphic Database Bari
In EDB there are currently 41,303 epigraphic texts (44,140 online, with 163 awaiting definitive approval), mostly developed on the basis of Inscriptiones Christianae Vrbis Romae septimo saeculo antiquiores, nova series, voll. I-X, as well as 7,736 images. Each epigraphic document is accompanied by data about bibliographical information, contexts, material, and graphical and linguistic elements. These texts mainly come from cemetery contexts of Christians in the Roman suburbs.

Fragmentary Texts 
Quotations and text re-uses of lost authors and works. This is a really helpful site for anyone interested in the appropriation of classical texts.

Greco-Roman Prosopographies
The beginnings of a collation of prosopographies of greco-roman persons/names, both digital and in print.

Guide to Evagrius Ponticus
This Guide provides definitive lists of Evagrius’s works, of editions and translations of those works, and of studies related to his life and thought. It includes an inventory of key ancient sources that refer to Evagrius and a display of imagery from the ancient world. Updated quarterly, the Guide will gradually introduce a manuscript checklist, images of manuscripts, transcriptions of those manuscripts, and open source critical editions of Evagrius’s writings.

Last Statues of Antiquity Database
Here you will find a searchable database of the published evidence for statuary and inscribed statue bases set up after AD 284, that were new, newly dedicated, or newly reworked.

The Latin Library Online
Online collection of Latin texts from the Roman world, early Christianity and Late Antiquity.

Late Antique and Early Medieval Inscriptions
The purpose of this website is to provide a full collection of links to on-line databases, books, PhDs, and articles on late antique and early medieval inscriptions, covering the period from A.D. 300 to 900. So far there are over 520 such links. Thorough and useful site, easy to navigate but lacking information on the Eastern Mediterranean.

Military Martyrs
The primary purpose of this site is to enable people to begin to explore the cult of the military martyrs during the late antique and early medieval periods by: providing original translations of many of the primary sources which have yet to be translated into English as well as making earlier translations which have gone out of copyright available online; summarizing the state of current research into the origin and growth of the cult of each these martyrs; and providing a bibliography of specialist works in respect of each martyr.

The Roads of Roman Britain
This website, launched by the Roman Roads Research Association in Spring 2018, provides a comprehensive online resource focusing on Roman roads in Britain. Covering all of Britain’s Roman roads, the Gazetteer, when completed, will be the first survey of Britain’s Roman Roads since Ivan Margary’s final edition of Roman Roads in Britain in 1973, now woefully out of date and often inaccurate. The Association aims to provide an up to date evaluation of each Roman road and, since new discoveries are being made all the time, this online resource provides flexibility to make amendments and additions. A fully up to date interactive map is currently under development.

The Roman Limes in Austria
The collection of border fortifications of the Roman Empire, known in Latin as the limes or ripa, is one of Europe’s largest ground monuments. They shape numerous cultural landscapes and form the nucleus of many European cities. In comparison with other Roman frontier sections the collection of fortifications has been well preserved in Austria, and there still exit a large number of towering ramparts of paramount importance that need significantly more research, which this projects hopes to initiate.

The Rural Settlement of Roman Britain: An Online Resource
This interactive map brings together the excavated evidence for the rural settlement of Roman Britain with the over-arching aim to inform a comprehensive reassessment of the countryside of Roman Britain. It includes both traditionally published reports and ‘grey-literature’ reports from developer-funded excavations since 1990.

Centre for the Study of Ancient Documents (CSAD)
This site includes databases on the following: Epigraphic Sources for Early Greek Writing; Greek Inscriptions in the Ashmolean Museum; Photographic Archive of Papyri in the Cairo Museum; Gazetteer of Papyri in British Collections; and Curse Tablets from the Uley Shrines.

The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World
Spanning one-ninth of the earth’s circumference across three continents, the Roman Empire ruled a quarter of humanity through complex networks of political power, military domination and economic exchange. These extensive connections were sustained by premodern transportation and communication technologies that relied on energy generated by human and animal bodies, winds, and currents. Conventional maps that represent this world as it appears from space signally fail to capture the severe environmental constraints that governed the flows of people, goods and information. Cost, rather than distance, is the principal determinant of connectivity. For the first time, ORBIS allows us to express Roman communication costs in terms of both time and expense. By simulating movement along the principal routes of the Roman road network, the main navigable rivers, and hundreds of sea routes in the Mediterranean, Black Sea and coastal Atlantic, this interactive model reconstructs the duration and financial cost of travel in antiquity. Taking account of seasonal variation and accommodating a wide range of modes and means of transport, ORBIS reveals the true shape of the Roman world and provides a unique resource for our understanding of premodern history.

Vindolanda Tablets Online
This site is an online edition of the Vindolanda writing tablets, excavated from the Roman fort at Vindolanda in northern England. The website is part of the Script, Image and the Culture of Writing in the Ancient World program, supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. It is a collaborative project between the Centre for the Study of Ancient Documents and the Academic Computing Development Team, Oxford University.

Vita Latina
Created in 1957, the magazine Vita Latina is published by the Association of the same name which was originally established in Avignon before being hosted in 1994 by the University of Montpellier III. It has long been written entirely in Latin, and also includes articles on classical authors, original literary creations (such as poems and short stories), and reflections on the news. It’s editorial policy has evolved and today it is addressed to all those who wish to stay informed in all areas of research in ancient studies (literature, history, philology, archaeology, philosophy, religion, mythology, arts, and architecture) from its origins to late antiquity and the early middle ages.

Early Middle Ages

Jarrow Hall: Anglo-Saxon Farm, Village and Bede Museum
This museum tells the story of Bede and his time, from the beginnings of the Anglo-Saxon period through his life, death and extraordinary legacy. Home to Europe’s largest collection of coloured glass from the 7th and 8th centuries alongside unique stonework and artefacts, the museum also hosts a full-sized reproduction of Codex Amiatinus. Some helpful links.

Celtic Inscribed Stones Project
CISP is undertaking a collaborative, interdisciplinary study of Medieval Celtic inscriptions. One of its main objectives is the compilation of an accessible, comprehensive and authoritative database of all known inscriptions. By bringing this material together in one place and making it readily available our goal is to turn what is a largely untapped resource into usable material. The scope of the project is the Celtic-speaking regions of the early middle ages, (Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Brittany, the Isle of Man, and parts of western England, in the period approximately AD 400-1100). Included are all stone monuments inscribed with text, whether in the Celtic vernacular or Latin, in the Roman alphabet or ogham (but excluding runic inscriptions). This site and database are easy to use, with plenty of explanatory material and even a downloadable PDF manual for more detailed information on the database. It is possible to browse indexes of the sites of stones, the names of the stones, indexes of the personal names mentioned in inscriptions and maps of the sites. The database also allows inscription (and more complex) searches. In general this is a very useful site; users should note however, that the site is no longer maintained, as the project is completed.

Corpus of Early Medieval Coin Finds
A project to gather together into a single database all of the single finds of coins minted AD 410-1180 found in the British Isles.

Ieldran Database – The Early Anglo-Saxon Cemetery Mapping Project
The Early Anglo-Saxon Mapping Project provides locations, summaries, and information about citation and collections for numerous cemeteries from the mid-fifth to early seventh centuries in England. Each site can be clicked on to reveal more information about the cemetery, the burials, associated artifacts, references for books and journal articles written about the cemetery, and where the original excavation materials, human remains and artifacts are kept.

Late Antique and Early Medieval Inscriptions
The purpose of this website is to provide a full collection of links to on-line databases, books, PhDs, and articles on late antique and early medieval inscriptions, covering the period from AD 300 to 900. So far there are over 520 such links. Thorough and useful site, easy to navigate but lacking information on the Eastern Mediterranean.

Littera Carolina: The Network for the Study of Caroline Miniscule
Scholars, especially students, have few resources or tools available to study Caroline miniscule beyond several seminal but increasingly out-of-date and out-of print works. Dialogue between the historians, art historians and linguists working with this script is impeded by distance and language barriers. There is no means of knowing the current state of research. In view of this, the Network for the Study of Caroline Miniscule aims to bring together an international body of scholars to address all aspects of the script. Annual colloquia will be held to act as a springboard for a more permanent network of research students and established scholars directly interested in the joint study of Caroline miniscule and in developing new tools and approaches for working with the script.

The Making of Charlemagne’s Europe
The Making of Charlemagne’s Europe project is a database of prosopographical and socio-economic data found in the more than four thousand legal documents surviving from Charlemagne’s reign. It covers material from all areas that were ever part of Charlemagne’s empire, dating from 25 September 768 to 28 January 814 AD. The emphasis is on the extraction and systematic classification of data for maximum comparability between regions. This will make the valuable information on institutions, people, places and objects contained in charters and other legal documents more easily accessible to researchers via faceted browsing, search engine queries and a mapping tool. The project was completed in December 2014, but the data remains accessible.

Military Martyrs
The primary purpose of this site is to enable people to begin to explore the cult of the military martyrs during the late antique and early medieval periods by: providing original translations of many of the primary sources which have yet to be translated into English as well as making earlier translations which have gone out of copyright available online; summarizing the state of current research into the origin and growth of the cult of each these martyrs; and providing a bibliography of specialist works in respect to each martyr.

Monastic Manuscript Project
The Monastic Manuscript Project is a database of descriptions of manuscripts that contain texts relevant for the study of early medieval monasticism, especially monastic rules, ascetic treatises, vitae patrum-texts and texts related to monastic reforms. The Project provides lists of manuscripts for each of these texts, which are linked to manuscript descriptions. The purpose is to offer a tool for reconstructing not only the manuscript dissemination of early medieval monastic texts but also to give access to the specific contexts in which a text appears.

Networks and Neighbours
Networks and Neighbours is an international collaborative project based at the University of Leeds and focussing on the study of Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. The project is the home of the Networks and Neighbours journal, published biannually in January and July. N&N also organises annual symposia. The project maintains that identity and meaning were not determined by fixed sets and integers, but by a complex network of interrelated signs. In practice, this suggests that a single person within their personal world could have travelled within various worlds and realities, identifying with various neighbours at even single overlapping points of identity; one did not encounter another as a fixed category, either of ‘self’ or ‘other’. Thus, by ‘network’ the Project does not mean a fixed identifier, a singularizing category, but a reference to the complex ways that individuals, groups, institutions etc. constructed self-considered, coherent and singular existences from the multiplicity of mental activity, perceptions, ideas, and the varying confrontation with images, physical and non-human being, languages, sounds, senses, ‘discourses’ and all else that was life in the period. This, then, is how the Project would like to make sense of the concepts of ‘continuity’ and ‘change’, particularly as they happened ‘on the ground’.

St Gall Manuscripts
The monastery of St. Gall in Switzerland was founded in 719 and still exists today. This collection is a group of manuscripts known to have been held in the St. Gall Library in the ninth century. Also included in this collection are manuscripts from the same period held in the nearby monastery of Reichenau. Analysis of extant monastic library catalogues and study of the hands of known scribes has made it possible to identify approximately seventy extant manuscripts that can be placed with certainty at these two monasteries in the course of the ninth century. By selecting one of the St. Gallen or Reichenau manuscripts from the list you can examine digital images of these manuscripts, codicological descriptions, bibliographies, as well as the texts that they contain. Currently, several manuscripts are available and more are being added continuously.

Viking Society Web Publications
Downloadable versions of all publications from the Viking Society for Northern Research from its inception in 1893 to the present. Includes the Dorothea Coke Memorial Lectures, the Saga-Book, A New Introduction to Old Norse, editions and translations of primary texts, and more. Note recent titles may not be released until five years from the date of publication.

Central/High Middle Ages

Base de Français Médiéval database
The Base de Français Médiéval database currently comprises twenty-four complete Old and Middle French texts. The volume and diversity of the texts included makes the database unique in France for this period of French history. The texts included in the BFM cover a considerable geographic area and an extensive chronological breadth, with texts from the 9th century to the end of the 15th century. Both verse and prose texts are represented, as well as different genres and domains. All the the BFM are XML-tagged following the recommendations of the TEI. The BFM is accessible free of charge for individual scholars, faculty and students.
English site

French site

Corpus Iuris Canonici
Complete set of the 1582 Corpus Juris Canonici, the “Body of Canon Law”. These three volumes contain not only the medieval collections of laws—notably, Gratian’s Decretum (ca. 1140), Gregory IX’s Liber Extra (1234), and Boniface VIII’s Liber Sextus (1298)—but also the elaborate Ordinary Glosses and further commentaries on the laws that take up the vast inner margins, with further annotations on outer margins. These glosses, which are absolutely essential to historians of law, have not been reprinted since the seventeenth century, and copies are scarce. The complete text of all three volumes of the Corpus Juris Canonici is online at this site. Also included here are corrected and expanded (and searchable) versions of the two indexes of vol. 2 (Liber Extra); one index, the Margarita, is to the decretals, and the other, called Materiae Singulares, is to the Gloss.

Dumbarton Oaks’ Byzantine Studies
Contains information about conferences, the Dumbarton Oaks collection (with selected images), fellowships, research library facilities and catalogue, publications, the Dumbarton Oaks Hagiography Database of the 8th-10th Century, and related internet links.

Forests and Chases of England and Wales c. 1000 to c. 1850
The purpose of the project is to raise awareness of, and excite interest in, the proposal to conduct systematic groundwork towards a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary investigation of the medieval and post-medieval spatial, temporal, functional, and cultural survival and significance of the Forests and Chases of England and Wales. Data exists in documents, maps and plans, literature, and fieldwork.

The Gatehouse: The Comprehensive Online Gazetteer and Bibliography of the Medieval Castles, Fortifications and Palaces of England, Wales, the Channel Isles and the Isle of Man
This site aspires to be a comprehensive listing of the medieval castles, castle sites, fortified houses, urban and coastal defences and other fortifications of England, Wales, the Channel Isles and the Isle of Man built or in use from 1000 to 1600. The site is regularly updated with location information, some brief site details, carefully considered web links and a full academic bibliography.

International Society of Hildegard von Bingen Studies
Founded in 1983 by Professor Bruce Hozeski of Ball State University, the International Society of Hildegard von Bingen Studies is comprised of scholars and enthusiasts interested in the promotion of the twelfth-century magistra, visionary, theologian, composer, healer, artist, leader of women, and Saint and Doctor of the Church. The purpose of the society is to promote the study, criticism, research and exchange of ideas related to all aspects of Hildegard von Bingen’s work.

Mapping Medieval Chester: place and identity in an English borderland city c.1200-1500
This project brings together scholars working in the disciplines of literary studies, geography, archaeology and history to explore how material and imagined urban landscapes construct and convey a sense of place-identity. The focus of the project is the city of Chester and the identities that its inhabitants formed between c.1200 and 1500. A key aspect of the project is to integrate geographical and literary mappings of the medieval city using cartographic and textual sources and using these to understand more how urban landscapes in the Middle Ages were interpreted and navigated by local inhabitants. One particularly innovative dimension of this is the project’s use of information technologies both as a means of exploring these ‘mappings’ of medieval Chester, for example through the use and development of a Geographical Information System (GIS) to create a map of Chester as it was c.1500, and as a means of widening access and public interest in Chester’s medieval past and in medieval urban studies generally by linking literary and cartographic sources in digital media. The project will thus not only extend our understanding of how placed-identities were forged in the medieval city through local association and relationships with imagined and material urban landscapes, but also foster transferable methodologies and working models for integrating visual and textual digital data sources in humanities computing projects.

Prosopography of the Middle Byzantine Period
The Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of sciences and humanities project “Prosopographie der mittelbyzantinischen Zeit (= PmbZ)” (Prosopography of the Middle-Byzantine Period) aims at creating a biographical dictionary for all people who lived between 641AD and 1025AD in the Byzantine Empire or were in contact with the Empire and are mentioned in the sources of that period. The individual articles offer the reader a summary of a person’s biography (where possible) and state all sources pertaining to this person. For technical reasons, the period covered by the PmbZ was divided into two sections (“Abteilungen”): the first running from 641 to 867, the second from 867 to 1025.

St Gall Manuscripts
The monastery of St. Gall in Switzerland was founded in 719 and still exists today. This collection is a group of manuscripts known to have been held in the St. Gall Library in the ninth century. Also included in this collection are manuscripts from the same period held in the nearby monastery of Reichenau. Analysis of extant monastic library catalogues and study of the hands of known scribes has made it possible to identify approximately seventy extant manuscripts that can be placed with certainty at these two monasteries in the course of the ninth century. By selecting one of the St. Gallen or Reichenau manuscripts from the list you can examine digital images of these manuscripts, codicological descriptions, bibliographies, as well as the texts that they contain. Currently, several manuscripts are available and more are being added continuously.

Troubadours, Trouveres and the Crusades 
The crusades have left a profound and disturbing legacy in inter-cultural and inter-faith relations nationally and worldwide. They continue to be of compelling interest and relevance to students, scholars and the wider public, with crusading rhetoric alive in the global political discourse transmitted daily in the media. A four-year Anglo-Italian project, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council of the UK, will allow academic researchers and teachers, school-teachers, students, and any interested member of the general public to access and exploit original source material. Some 200 texts will be made freely accessible and downloadable online in high-quality editions, and will be translated into both English and Italian.

Late Middle Ages

Astronomical Images “Diagrams, Figures, and the Transformation of Astronomy, 1450-1650”
This project aims to examine the roles of visual representations in the early modern transformation of astronomy, featuring editions, translations and commentary of late-medieval astronomical texts and images. A University of Cambridge Raven login is necessary for access.

City Witness: Medieval Swansea
A thriving port, a marcher base for the lords of Gower, and a multi-cultural urban community, Swansea was an important centre in the Middle Ages, comparable with many other historic European towns. Yet the medieval legacy of Swansea is almost invisible today. This project aims to further our understanding of medieval Swansea, to forge connections between the modern city and its medieval antecedent, and through digital mapping and textual analysis to reveal how medieval individuals from different cultural and ethnic communities understood and represented their town.

Dafydd ap Gwilym.net
This site provides English translations of the poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym (c.1315/1320 – c. 1350/1370), regarded as one of the leading Welsh poets and amongst the great poets of Europe in the Middle Ages.

Forests and Chases of England and Wales c. 1000 to c. 1850
The purpose of the project is to raise awareness of, and excite interest in, the proposal to conduct systematic groundwork towards a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary investigation of the medieval and post-medieval spatial, temporal, functional, and cultural survival and significance of the Forests and Chases of England and Wales. Data exists in documnets, maps and plans, literature, and fieldwork.

The Gatehouse: The Comprehensive Online Gazetteer and Bibliography of the Medieval Castles, Fortifications and Palaces of England, Wales, the Channel Isles and the Isle of Man
This site aspires to be a comprehensive listing of the medieval castles, castle sites, fortified houses, urban and coastal defences and other fortifications of England, Wales, the Channel Isles and the Isle of Man built or in use from 1000 to 1600. The site is regularly updated with location information, some brief site details, carefully considered web links and a full academic bibliography.

Guto’r Glyn.net
English translations of the poetry of Guto’r Glynn (c. 1412-c.1493), a Welsh language poet and soldier of the era of the Beirdd yr Uchelwyr (“Poets of the Nobility”) or Cywyddwyr (“cywydd-men”), the itinerant professional poets of the later Middle Ages. He is considered one of the greatest exponents, if not the greatest, of the tradition of “praise-poetry”, verse addressed to a nobel patron. In addition, this page explains life in 15th century Wales and the Marches.

The Henry Daniel Project
Showcasing the work of Henry Daniel, fourteenth-century author of Middle English texts on urine and herbs.

Mapping the Medieval Countryside: Places, People, and Properties in the Inquisitions Post Mortem
Mapping the Medieval Countryside is a major research project dedicated to the online publication of medieval English inquisitions post mortem (IPMs). These inquisitions, which recorded the lands held at their deaths by tenants of the crown, comprise the most extensive and important body of source material for landholding in medieval England. They describe the lands held by thousands of families, from nobles to peasants, and are a key source for the history of almost every settlement in England (and of many in Wales). They are indispensable to local and family historians as well as to academic specialists in areas as diverse as agrarian history to political society. The project will publish a searchable English translation of the IPMs covering the periods 1236 to 1447 and 1485 to 1509. From 1399 to 1447 the text will be enhanced to enable sophisticated analysis and mapping of the inquisitions’ contents. The online texts will be accompanied by a wealth of commentary and interpretation to enable all potential users to use this source easily and effectively.

The Medingen Manuscripts
This project will virtually bring together the scattered late medieval library of the Cistercian nunnery of Medingen. Between the internal reform of the convent in 1477 and the advent of the Lutheran Reformation in the neighbouring town Lüneburg in 1526, the Medingen scriptorium developed into a major source of Latin and Middle Low German prayer-books. The nuns produced an astonishing wealth of illuminated manuscripts in which they expanded the Latin liturgy with vernacular prayers, lay-songs and meditations – for themselves as well as for the noblewomen of the neighbouring town. Database features include a bibliography, list of sigla, short descriptions of the manuscripts, glossary, archive, and a map of libraries holding Medingen Manuscripts.

Richard II’s Treasure
The treasure roll of Richard II, compiled in 1398/9, offers a rare insight into the magnificence of a late medieval English king. The roll, unknown until it was rediscovered in the 1990s, describes in exceptional detail the crowns, jewels, and other precious objects belonging to the king and to his two queens, Anne of Bohemia and Isabelle of France. This website brings the treasure to life through images – of the roll, of Richard himself and of many exquisite objects.

Sciencia.cat
This site provides the international academic community and the general public with access to a part of the Catalan historical heritage which is yet little known or studied: the scientific and technical works which circulated in the Catalan language – either originals or translations from other languages – during the last centuries of the Middle Ages and early Renaissance (13th-16th c.).

Troubadours, Trouveres and the Crusades 
The crusades have left a profound and disturbing legacy in inter-cultural and inter-faith relations nationally and worldwide. They continue to be of compelling interest and relevance to students, scholars and the wider public, with crusading rhetoric alive in the global political discourse transmitted daily in the media. A four-year Anglo-Italian project, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council of the UK, will allow academic researchers and teachers, school-teachers, students, and any interested member of the general public to access and exploit original source material. Some 200 texts will be made freely accessible and downloadable online in high-quality editions, and will be translated into both English and Italian.

Renaissance and Early Modern

An Analytic Bibliography of Online Neo-Latin Texts
The enormous profusion of literary texts posted on the World Wide Web will no doubt strike future historians as remarkable and important, but this profusion brings with it an urgent need for many specialized online bibliographies. This is an analytic bibliography of Latin texts written during the Renaissance and later that are freely available to the general public on the Web (texts posted in access-restricted sites, and sites offering electronic texts and digitized photographic reproductions for sale are not included).

ANZAMEMS (Australian and NZ Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies)
ANZAMEMS exists to promote medieval and early modern studies in Australia and New Zealand. It was formed in 1996 by the merger of ANZAMRS (Australian and New Zealand Association of Medieval and Renaissance Studies) and AHMEME (Australian Historians of Medieval and Early Modern Europe).

CARA (Committee on Centers and Regional Associations)
Developed from organizations active in the 1960’s, CARA became a standing committee of the Medieval Academy of America in 1969 to serve as a forum for those who are concerned with the administration of institutes, graduate centers, undergraduate programs and committees, and research libraries; with the organization of regional and local groups of medievalists; and with teaching. CARA assists institutions and individual medievalists in meeting the challenges that face medieval studies in the classroom, the library, and other institutional settings locally and nationally; CARA’s mission is advocacy and problem-solving.

Corpus Iuris Canonici
Complete set of the 1582 Corpus Juris Canonici, the “Body of Canon Law.” These three volumes contain not only the medieval collections of laws—notably, Gratian’s Decretum (ca. 1140), Gregory IX’s Liber Extra (1234), and Boniface VIII’s Liber Sextus (1298)—but also the elaborate Ordinary Glosses and further commentaries on the laws that take up the vast inner margins, with further annotations on outer margins. These glosses, which are absolutely essential to historians of law, have not been reprinted since the seventeenth century, and copies are scarce. The complete text of all three volumes of the Corpus Juris Canonici is online at this site. Also included here are corrected and expanded (and searchable) versions of the two indexes of vol. 2 (Liber Extra); one index, the Margarita, is to the decretals, and the other, called Materiae Singulares, is to the Gloss.

The Digital Scriptorium
The Digital Scriptorium, a searchable image database of medieval and renaissance manuscripts.

Forests and Chases of England and Wales c. 1000 to c. 1850
The purpose of the project is to raise awareness of, and excite interest in, the proposal to conduct systematic groundwork towards a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary investigation of the medieval and post-medieval spatial, temporal, functional, and cultural survival and significance of the Forests and Chases of England and Wales. Data exists in documents, maps and plans, literature, and fieldwork.

The Gatehouse: The Comprehensive Online Gazetteer and Bibliography of the Medieval Castles, Fortifications and Palaces of England, Wales, the Channel Isles and the Isle of Man
This site aspires to be a comprehensive listing of the medieval castles, castle sites, fortified houses, urban and coastal defences and other fortifications of England, Wales, the Channel Isles and the Isle of Man built or in use from 1000 to 1600. The site is regularly updated with location information, some brief site details, carefully considered web links and a full academic bibliography.

The Many-Headed Monster (Blog)
This blog is a collaborative effort focusing on English society and culture in the early modern period, very broadly conceived. The title of the blog comes from the paranoid imaginations of seventeenth-century gentlemen, who often conceived of ‘the common people’ as a monstrous beast that would devour the rich whole if given the chance. This blog tries to understand what society looked like ‘from below’. A panel of academics regularly contribute.

Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society
The Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society is an academic association of scholars and other persons interested in medieval and Renaissance drama whose activities include organizing annual meetings, sponsoring long-range research projects, and publishing material of interest to the Society including research opportunities in Medieval and Renaissance Drama.

Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts [UCLA Collection]
This site includes manuscripts and manuscript leaves, in scripts of the Latin alphabet, ranging from Carolingian minuscule to Burgundian letter and humanist script, written across Europe before 1600 and representing the Latin, Italian, German, Dutch, English, French, Spanish, and Czech languages. Types of manuscripts include liturgical works, collections of sermons and the florilegia used for sermon composition, confessionals and penitentials for pastoral care, vernacular literature such as romances and verse, business and administrative records, including Italian and French land records – charters, cartularies, terriers, and rent rolls dating from the late thirteenth century to the seventeenth.

Sciencia.cat
This site provides the international academic community and the general public with access to a part of the Catalan historical heritage which is yet little known or studied: the scientific and technical works which circulated in the Catalan language – either originals or translations from other languages – during the last centuries of the Middle Ages and early Renaissance (13th-16th c.).

Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum
An evolving database created in 1990 by Indiana University and the Jacobs School of Music, this source aims to give free access to the entire corpus of Latin music theory written during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.