Topic Areas

Archaeology

Celtic Inscribed Stones Project
CISP is undertaking a collaborative, interdisciplinary study of Medieval Celtic inscriptions. One of its main objectives is the compilation of an accessible, comprehensive and authoritative database of all known inscriptions. By bringing this material together in one place and making it readily available our goal is to turn what is a largely untapped resource into usable material. The scope of the project is the Celtic-speaking regions of the early middle ages, (Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Brittany, the Isle of Man, and parts of western England, in the period approximately AD 400-1100). Included are all stone monuments inscribed with text, whether in the Celtic vernacular or Latin, in the Roman alphabet or ogham (but excluding runic inscriptions). This site and database are easy to use, with plenty of explanatory material and even a downloadable PDF manual for more detailed information on the database. It is possible to browse indexes of the sites of stones, the names of the stones, indexes of the personal names mentioned in inscriptions and maps of the sites. The database also allows inscription (and more complex) searches. In general this is a very useful site; users should note however, that the site is no longer maintained, as the project is completed.

Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture
The Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture (CASSS) is a project to identify, record and publish in a consistent format, the earliest English sculpture dating from the 7th to the 11th centuries. Much of this material was unpublished before the work began, but it is of crucial importance as it points to the earliest settlements and artistic achievements of the Anglo-Saxon/Pre-Norman English. It ranges from our earliest Christian field monuments (free-standing carved crosses), to innovative decorative elements and furnishings of churches, to humble grave-markers. This site contains a searchable database of sculpture records and images of the sculptures which are organised by the published volumes. There are, as yet, no direct weblinks between the records and the images, so each needs to be found separately, and the database is initially confusing for the casual user. There is also a very useful ‘Grammar of Anglo-Saxon Ornament’, which explains how the sculptures are classified and made. In summary, while the design and layout of the website is not perfect, the content is extremely useful.

Council for British Archaeology
Website for the Council for British Archaeology, a good starting point for information about archaeology in Britain and the rest of the world.

Ename Center For Public Archaeology and Heritage Presentation
The Ename Center was founded in 1998 as a non-profit association to develop and disseminate expertise relating to the public interpretation and sustainable development of archaeological sites, museums, historical monuments and landscapes both in Flanders and at partner sites throughout the world.

Ieldran Database – The Early Anglo-Saxon Cemetery Mapping Project
The Early Anglo-Saxon Mapping Project provides locations, summaries, and information about citation and collections for numerous cemeteries from the mid-fifth to early seventh centuries in England. Each site can be clicked on to reveal more information about the cemetery, the burials, associated artifacts, references for books and journal articles written about the cemetery, and where the original excavation materials, human remains and artifacts are kept.

Society for Medieval Archaeology
Searchable database of their publication, Medieval Archaeology, as well as information on monograph series, regular newsletters, and further medieval archaeology links. In addition, to celebrate the Society’s 50th anniversary, the first fifty volumes of Medieval Archaeology have been released online.

West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service
Central website for archaeology in West Yorkshire. Contains a variety of resources for all levels of interest, from professionals and teachers to members of the public.

Art and Architecture

Beyond Borders
A blog dedicated to Medieval History of Art.

The Cambridge Illuminations: Virtual Exhibition
This is a representative selection of images from some of the most sumptuous manuscripts displayed in the Cambridge Illuminations exhibition (Fitzwilliam Museum, 26 July – 30 December 2005). Includes flash animation of how manuscripts are made.

The Corpus of Medieval Narrative Art 
This repository of images is a result of the photographic process in Dr. Stuart Whatling’s PhD research at the Courtauld Institute of Art. The photographs catalogued in this resource focus on narrative art, comprising around 3000 pages of medieval images that tell a story.

The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland
The aim of the project – still in progress – is to photograph and record all surviving Romanesque sculpture. To do this, volunteer fieldworkers describe, measure and photograph Romanesque sites. The project editors convert the raw materials of their research into an electronic archive. Church plans, generously made available by the Church Plans Online project, are included where available as an additional visual aid.

Corpus Vitrearum Medii Aevi – Medieval Stained Glass in Great Britain
The purpose of these pages is to make available a variety of texts crucial to the understanding of the conservation and restoration of stained glass. All but one of these texts are appearing here in English for the first time, and they cover a wide range of technical and aesthetic considerations.

Exeter Cathedral Keystones and Carvings
A Catalogue Raisonné of the Sculptures & Their Polychromy, written by Avril K. Henry and Anna C. Hulbert. This is an illustrated introduction to, and explanatory catalogue of, all the figurative sculpture of the medieval building. This extensive website is designed primarily for art historians and medievalists, but can also be useful for the non-specialist.

The Gatehouse: The Comprehensive Online Gazetteer and Bibliography of the Medieval Castles, Fortifications and Palaces of England, Wales, the Channel Isles and the Isle of Man
This site aspires to be a comprehensive listing of the medieval castles, castle sites, fortified houses, urban and coastal defences and other fortifications of England, Wales, the Channel Isles and the Isle of Man built or in use from 1000 to 1600. The site is regularly updated with location information, some brief site details, carefully considered web links and a full academic bibliography.

History of Architecture
This site is designed to support undergraduate education, from introductory art and architectural history surveys to advanced courses on specific art historical periods and themes. The project has been funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Division of Education Programs, with additional support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation and the Office of the Provost, Columbia University.

The Index of Medieval Art
In 2017, the Index of Christian Art was renamed to the Index of Medieval Art, reflecting the broad evolution of Princeton’s scope and mission since its founding in 1917, when its work was limited to cataloguing religious themes and subjects in early Christian art up to 700 CE. A century later, the records have expanded to encompass both religious and secular imagery, including Jewish and Islamic works. The Index includes images and descriptive data relating to works of art produced between early apostolic times and the sixteenth century. To receive full access to the database, subscribing is essential.

International Center of Medieval Art
International Center of Medieval Art website, with links to medieval art history resources on the internet.

The Medieval Stained Glass Photographic Archive
This site includes over 40,000 photographs of pre-1800 stained glass panels at over 500 locations, mostly in England and France. The site is regularly updated, with Rouen, St Patrice and St Romain added in June 2017 and improvements to tablet searching completed in July 2019. In addition, over 15,000 non-stained glass photographs of art such as sculpture and mosaics are also included. At this stage the purpose of the Archive is only to display windows and panels together with an identification of the subject matter and to give some dates. However, as the project evolves it is hoped that more basic information and more bibliographic references on each window will also be given.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Medieval Collection Online 
The Museum’s collection of medieval and Byzantine art is among the most comprehensive in the world. Displayed in both the Main Building and in the Metropolitan’s branch in northern Manhattan, The Cloisters museum and gardens, the collection encompasses the art of the Mediterranean and Europe from the fall of Rome in the fourth century to the beginning of the Renaissance in the early sixteenth century. It also includes pre-medieval European works of art created during the Bronze Age and early Iron Age. This online catalogue contains more than 9000 digitised items for browsing and education.

Pittsburgh Medieval Art and Architecture
The purpose of this site is to promote education and research in Medieval art and architecture. The site currently contains images from England and France, as well as a glossary of terms. Developed over the period c. 1995-2012, the site is no longer regularly updated and no major additions are envisioned.

Renaissance Art History
A general resource for the topic.

Cult of Saints and Hagiography

Acta Sanctorum: The Full Text Database
The Acta Sanctorum Database is an electronic version of the complete printed text of Acta Sanctorum, from the edition published in sixty-eight volumes by the Societé des Bollandistes in Antwerp and Brussels. It is a collection of documents examining the lives of saints, organised according to each saint’s feast day, and runs from the two January volumes published in 1643 to the Propylaeum to December published in 1940. The Acta Sanctorum Database contains the complete Acta Sanctorum, including all prefatory material, original texts, critical apparatus and indices. Bibliotheca Hagiographica Latina reference numbers, essential references for scholars, are also included.

Christian Classics Ethereal Library: Early Church Fathers
The Christian Classics Ethereal Library is a digital library of hundreds of classic Christian books selected for edification and education.

The Cult of Saints in the Carolingian Empire: A Bibliography
Compiled by Thomas Head, Hunter College and Graduate Center, CUNY.

Hagiography Society
The Hagiography Society exists to promote communication among scholars studying holy people and their cults in all eras, cultures, and religious traditions. The Society sponsors multiple sessions at various academic conferences on both sides of the Atlantic, publishes regular newsletters and maintains a listserv and an online member directory and bibliography.

Patrologia Latina
The Patrologia Latina is an enormous collection of the writings of the Church Fathers and other ecclesiastical writers published by Jacques-Paul Migne between 1841 and 1855, with indices published between 1862 and 1865. This web version contains scans only.

Pilgrims and Pilgrimage: Patterns of Pilgrimage in England c. 1100-1500
This website outlines the multiple meanings of pilgrimage within the Christian tradition in particular, exploring their expression through the centuries and their continuing significance today. This survey is set against the background of the importance of pilgrimage in faiths and cultures worldwide.

The Saints in Art: With Their Attributes and Symbols Alphabetically Arranged
A searchable online text of the 1908 book by Margaret E. Tabor, listing Christian saints and their saintly attributes and symbols. Not strictly medieval, but may be of interest in identifying figures of saints in art and architecture.

Drama and Music

CANTUS: A Database for Latin Ecclesiastical Chant
CANTUS is a database of the Latin chants found in over 140 manuscripts and early printed books. This searchable digital archive holds inventories of primarily antiphoners and breviaries from medieval Europe; these are the main sources for the music sung in the Latin liturgical Office. New phases of the project include adding chant melodies to existing records and indexing manuscripts for the Mass, including those sources that contain sequences.

The CMME Project
The CMME Project is a scholarly initiative to offer free online access to new, high-quality early music scores produced by today’s leading experts. Based at Utrecht University in the Netherlands, the project represents a collaborative development effort of specialists in musicology, information science, and music retrieval. The Project seeks to produce and maintain an online corpus of electronic editions, in addition to software tools to make them accessible to students, scholars, performers, and interested amateurs.

Dafydd ap Gwilym.net
This site provides English translations of the poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym (c.1315/1320 – c. 1350/1370), regarded as one of the leading Welsh poets and amongst the great poets of Europe in the Middle Ages.

Digital Image Archive of Medieval Music
An online resource for the study of fragments and complete manuscripts of European Medieval Polyphonic Music.

e-Sequence
Audiovisual digital representation of the Saint Gall corpus of Sequences by Notker Balbulus from selected manuscripts.

Guto’r Glyn.net
English translations of the poetry of Guto’r Glynn (c. 1412-c.1493), a Welsh language poet and soldier of the era of the Beirdd yr Uchelwyr (“Poets of the Nobility”) or Cywyddwyr (“cywydd-men”), the itinerant professional poets of the later Middle Ages. He is considered one of the greatest exponents, if not the greatest, of the tradition of “praise-poetry”, verse addressed to a noble patron. In addition this page explains life in 15th century Wales and the Marches.

International Society of Hildegard von Bingen Studies
Founded in 1983 by Professor Bruce Hozeski of Ball State University, the International Society of Hildegard von Bingen Studies is comprised of scholars and enthusiasts interested in the promotion of the twelfth-century magistra, visionary, theologian, composer, healer, artist, leader of women, and Saint and Doctor of the Church. The purpose of the society is to promote the study, criticism, research and exchange of ideas related to all aspects of Hildegard von Bingen’s work.

REED N-E: Records of Early English Drama North-East
REED’s mission is to locate, transcribe, and edit all surviving documentary evidence of drama, minstrelsy, and public ceremonial in England before 1642. Website contains performance texts, modern editions, and a useful page of links to the study of drama.

Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum
An evolving database of the entire corpus of Latin music theory written during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Epigraphy

Ancient Inscriptions of the Northern Black Sea
IOSPE is an international collaborative project operating under the aegis of the International Union of Academies since 2001. The aims of the project include a new study of all Ancient Greek and Latin inscriptions originating from the Northern Coast of the Black Sea; and publication of Russian and English critical editions of the inscriptions in print and digital formats. The region of the Northern Black Sea was home to numerous ancient Greek settlements from the third quarter of the 7th century BCE until the fall of Constantinople in 1453 CE. Inscriptiones antiquae Orae Septentrionalis Ponti Euxini graecae et latinae (IOSPE) was the title of the first corpus of ancient inscriptions from the Northern Coast of the Black Sea published in 1885-1901 by Vasilii Latyshev. This title is retained for reasons of conceptual and bibliographic continuity.

Aphrodias in Late Antiquity
This is the electronic second edition, expanded and revised from the version published by the Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies in 1989. The editions and commentary are by Charlotte Roueché, except for Text 1, by Joyce Reynolds. The electronic editorial conventions were developed by Tom Elliott (EpiDoc), and the website and the supporting materials are the work of Gabriel Bodard, Paul Spence, and colleagues at King’s.

The Database of Jewish Epigraphy 
Epidat – The Database of Jewish epigraphy – provides the inventory, documentation, editing and presentation of epigraphic collections. Currently available online are 199 digital editions with 35,526 tombs.

Epigraphic Database Bari
In EDB there are currently 41,303 Christian inscriptions from Late Ancient Rome and 7736 images, mostly developed on the basis of Inscriptiones Christianae Vrbis Romae septimo saeculo antiquiores, nova series, vol. I-X. Every epigraphic document is accompanied by data about bibliographic information, contexts, material, and graphical and linguistic elements.

Epigraphisches Forschungs- und Dokumentationszentrum
German-language website dedicated to epigraphy. This site offers an introduction to epigraphy, a dictionary of epigraphical terminology and links to related sites on the web.

Fragmentary Texts 
Quotations and text re-uses of lost authors and works. This is a really helpful site for anyone interested in the appropriation of classical texts.

Hispania Epigraphica
Roman inscriptions from the Iberian peninsula.

Inscriptions of Palestine
This project seeks to collect and make accessible all of the previously published inscriptions (and their English translations) of Palestine from the Persian period through the Islamic conquest (ca. 500 BCE – 640 CE). There are about 15,000 of these inscriptions, written primarily in Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek and Latin, by Jews, Christians, Greeks, and Romans. They range from imperial declarations on monumental architecture to notices of donations in synagogues to humble names scratched on ossuaries, and include everything in between. There are approximately 2,500 inscriptions currently in the database, with more added regularly. Inscriptions of Palestine is an ongoing project at Brown University.

Last Statues of Antiquity Database
Here you will find a searchable database of the published evidence for statuary and inscribed statue bases set up after AD 284, that were new, newly dedicated, or newly reworked.

Gender

Epistolae: Medieval Women’s Letters
Epistolae is a collection of letters to and from women dating from the fourth to the thirteenth century AD. These letters from the Middle Ages, written in Latin, are presented with English translations and are organised by the name and biography of the women writers or recipients. Biographical sketches of the women and descriptions of the subject matter or the historic context of the letter are included where available.

Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index
Covers journal articles, book reviews, and essays in books about women, sexuality, and gender during the Middle Ages. Books written by a single author are not indexed here.

The History of Women Religious of Britain and Ireland
The History of Women Religious of Britain and Ireland (H-WRBI) network encourages research of women religious and makes available material to facilitate that research. The network is broad in scope and time period, covering the history of women religious from medieval to modern times. The network includes academics, archivists, students and others interested in this area of study.

International Society of Hildegard von Bingen Studies
Founded in 1983 by Professor Bruce Hozeski of Ball State University, the International Society of Hildegard von Bingen Studies is comprised of scholars and enthusiasts interested in the promotion of the twelfth-century magistra, visionary, theologian, composer, healer, artist, leader of women, and Saint and Doctor of the Church. The purpose of the society is to promote the study, criticism, research and exchange of ideas related to all aspects of Hildegard von Bingen’s work.

Monastic Matrix
A scholarly resource for the study of women’s religious communities from 400 to 1600 CE.

Wives, Widows and Wimples: Women in the University of Nottingham’s medieval collections
This resource draws on the University of Nottingham’s rich medieval collections. The collections include stories of knights and their quest; works of learning and instruction in moral conduct; records of saints and of religious practice; and legal documents relating to landholding and marriage. They use the contemporary languages of English, French and Anglo-Norman as well as Latin. The evidence of the Church (medieval Roman Catholic) is evident throughout. The resource is divided into twelve subject areas. Each area includes images, transcripts and translations of original material, with explanatory commentary placing the items in context.

Jewish Studies

The Database of Jewish Epigraphy 
Epidat – The Database of Jewish epigraphy – provides the inventory, documentation, editing and presentation of epigraphic collections. Currently available online are 199 digital editions with 35,526 epitaphs.

Digital Mishnah
This site accompanies and hosts the development of a born-digital critical edition of the Mishnah. When fully implemented, the project will provide a dynamic edition of the Mishnah that takes advantage of its medium to provide multiple and customizable presentations of the text, as well as analytical tools that will allow the user to study variability between witnesses as well as other features. The site also hosts a demo of the online Mishnah and a blog tracing the ongoing development of the project.

Hebrew Manuscripts at the British Library
The British Library’s collection of Hebrew manuscripts is one of the most important in the world. Its volumes embrace many areas of Hebrew literature, with the Bible, the Talmud, kabbalah, philosophy and poetry being particularly well-represented.

Khazaria 
A Resource for Turkic and Jewish History in Russia and Ukraine.

Medieval Jewish Studies Online
Medieval Jewish Studies online is the Internet platform for scholars working in the fields of medieval Jewish history, literature, art and culture. Since research in Jewish culture and intellectual history is conducted, with few exceptions, in many national and international academic institutions (primarily in Germany, France, Italy, Israel and the United States), Medieval Jewish Studies online is meant to facilitate exchanges between related disciplines of Medieval Jewish culture and intellectual history as well as to pool their academic findings. The website is inactive at the moment, although users are redirected to the email address liss@medieval-jewish-studies.org. The group is also currently active on Facebook.

Language Research

An Analytic Bibliography of online Neo-Latin Texts
The enormous profusion of literary texts posted on the Web will no doubt strike future historians as remarkable and important, but this profusion brings with it an urgent need for many specialized online bibliographies. This is an analytic bibliography of Latin texts written during the Renaissance and later that are freely available to the general public on the Web (texts posted in access-restricted sites, and sites offering electronic texts and digitized photographic reproductions for sale are not included).

Anglo-Norman Dictionary
Also includes digitized versions of relevant texts.

William Whitaker’s Words
The dictionary contains over 39,000 entries. This may generate many hundreds of thousands of ‘words’ that one can construct over all the declensions and conjugations. The point of this tool is to help in simple translations for a beginning Latin student or amateur. A few hundred prefixes and suffixes further enlarge the range. These will generate tens of thousands of additional words — some of which are recognized Latin words, some of which are perfectly reasonable words which were never used by Cicero or Caesar but might have been used by Augustine or some monk at Jarrow, and some are nonsense.

Law and Legal History

Early English Laws
Early English Laws is a project to publish online and in print new editions and translations of all English legal codes, edicts, and treatises produced up to the time of Magna Carta 1215.

Lex Frisionum
The Lex Frisionum is the Frisian book of law. It was recorded 12 centuries ago, during the reign of Charlemagne. This site offers information about the contents and the origin of the law code. Four webpages contain the full original text of Lex Frisionum (in Latin) plus a translation into English.

The Salic Law
Translated excerpts from the Salic Law Code.

The Visigothic Code (Forum Judicium)
PDF version of S.P. Scott’s translation of the Visigothic Law Code.

Medicine

Arnau D. Corpus digial d’Arnau de Vilanova
Showcasing the work of major medieval Catalan physician, Arnau de Vilanova.

Astronomical Images “Diagrams, Figures, and the Transformation of Astronomy, 1450-1650”
This project aims to examine the roles of visual representations in the early modern transformation of astronomy, featuring editions, translations and commentary of late-medieval astronomical texts and images. A University of Cambridge Raven login is necessary for access.

Bibliothèque interuniversitaire de santé
Website of Paris-based medical library, with scans of printed books in medicine including early modern editions of medieval texts.

The Casebooks Project: A Digital Edition of Simon Forman’s & Richard Napier’s Medical Records 1596-1634
Digitised records of the casebooks of early modern astrologers Simon Forman and Richard Napier. Records can be browsed or searched. Website also hosts information on studying astrological medicine, the use of sixteenth-century documentary records, and the history of medical record-keeping.

The Henry Daniel Project
Showcasing the work of Henry Daniel, fourteenth-century author of Middle English texts on urine and herbs.

Index of Medieval Medical Images
The IMMI is a collection of 13 manuscripts that have been digitized and are accessible through the UCLA library. Along with a digital copy of the manuscript, each entry also includes the repository, date of creation and place of origin. Despite being called medical images, most are primarily pages of text with images in the margins.

Islamic Medical Manuscripts at the National Library of Medicine
Online exhibition based on Islamic medical manuscripts held at the National Library of Medicine, including a catalogue of manuscripts dealing with medieval medicine and science (including images), and bibliographies of major medieval Islamic writers.

A Literary History of Medicine: “The Best Accounts of the Classes of Physicians” by Ibn Abī Usaybiʿah (d. 1270)
Online edition and partial translation of this comprehensive thirteenth-century history of medicine. Part of an ongoing project, with new material being added.

The MacKinney Collection of Medieval Medical Illustrations
Digitising the remarkable collection of slides of medieval medical illustrations produced by Professor of medieval history and specialist in medieval medical history Loren C. MacKinney in the 1940s-60s.

Medicine in Medieval Egypt
Online exhibition hosted by Cambridge University Library of the medical material preserved in the Cairo Genizah. Material in Hebrew, Arabic, and Judaeo-Arabic. The fragments are dated from the tenth to the thirteenth centuries.

Medieval Medicine
An introductory survey of medieval medicine.

Sciencia.cat
This site provides the international academic community and the general public with access to a part of the Catalan historical heritage which is yet little known or studied: the scientific and technical works which circulated in the Catalan lanugage – either originals or translations from other languages – during the last centuries of the Middle Ages and early Renaissance (13th-16th c.).

U.S. National Library of Medicine
Website of medical library in Bethesda, MA, with many online resources.

Voigts-Kutz Search Program (University of Missouri, Kansas City)
Tool for searching for manuscripts containing medical material in medieval Latin and English. Search using incipits (opening words).

Wellcome Library
Website of London-based medical library, with a large image collection and other resources.

Military History and Warfare

De Re Militari – The Society for Medieval Military History
De Re Militari hosts many primary sources, articles, dissertations and resources for the study of military actions, technology and topics from the fall of Rome to the early seventeenth century.

The Gatehouse: The Comprehensive Online Gazetteer and Bibliography of the Medieval Castles, Fortifications and Palaces of England, Wales, the Channel Isles and the Isle of Man
This site aspires to be a comprehensive listing of the medieval castles, castle sites, fortified houses, urban and coastal defences and other fortifications of England, Wales, the Channel Isles and the Isle of Man built or in use from 1000 to 1600. The site is regularly updated with location information, some brief site details, carefully considered web links and a full academic bibliography.

Military Martyrs
The primary purpose of this site is to enable people to begin to explore the cult of the military martyrs during the late antique and early medieval periods by: providing original translations of many of the primary sources which have yet to be translated into English as well as making earlier translations which have gone out of copyright available online; summarizing the state of current research into the origin and growth of the cult of each these martyrs; and providing a bibliography of specialist works in respect to each martyr.

Internet Medieval Sourcebook – Selected Sources: The Crusades
A subcategory of Fordham University’s incredibly useful Internet Medieval Sourcebook. This selection provides primary sources regarding the various movements of the Crusades in translation.

Troubadours, Trouveres and the Crusades 
The crusades have left a profound and disturbing legacy in inter-cultural and inter-faith relations nationally and worldwide. They continue to be of compelling interest and relevance to students, scholars and the wider public, with crusading rhetoric alive in the global political discourse transmitted daily in the media. A four-year Anglo-Italian project, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council of the UK, will allow academic researchers and teachers, school-teachers, students, and any interested member of the general public to access and exploit original source material. Some 200 texts will be made freely accessible and downloadable online in high-quality editions, and will be translated into both English and Italian.

Numismatics

British Numismatics Journal
The BNJ is the Society’s principal publication and has been published since 1903. A significant number of past issues are freely available to download and search.

Corpus of Early Medieval Coin Finds
A project to gather together into a single database all of the single finds of coins minted AD 410-1180 found in the British Isles.

Department of Coins and Medals, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge
Online exhibition, listing of coins, and coin search functions.

Yorkshire Numismatics Society
Founded in 1909 and affiliated with the British Association of Numismatic Societies since 1953, the Society’s blog includes important links and current information about British numismatics.

Philosophy

Mediaeval Logic and Philosophy
This Web site is maintained by Paul Vinent Spade at Indiana University. It is intended for anyone interested in mediaeval logic and philosophy broadly construed.

Philosophies of History
A project organised and run by Leeds medievalists dedicated to exploring the philosophies and theories behind the study of history and how we we might apply them to our research in order to maintain innovation within the discipline of History.

Prosopography

Greco-Roman Prosopographies
The beginnings of a collation of prosopographies of Greco-Roman persons/names, both digital and in print.

The Making of Charlemagne’s Europe
The Making of Charlemagne’s Europe project is a database of prosopographical and socio-economic data found in the more than four thousand legal documents surviving from Charlemagne’s reign. It covers material from all areas that were ever part of Charlemagne’s empire, dating from 25 September 768 to 28 January 814 AD. The emphasis is on the extraction and systematic classification of data for maximum comparability between regions. This will make the valuable information on institutions, people, places and objects contained in charters and other legal documents more easily accessible to researchers via faceted browsing, search engine queries and a mapping tool.

Medieval Lands – A Prosopography of Medieval European Noble and Royal Families
Medieval Lands presents narratives and biographical genealogies of the major noble families which ruled Europe, North Africa and Western Asia between the fifth and fifteenth centuries. The approach is to verify all information against primary source material, quoting relevant extracts in the original language. This has enabled many traditionally accepted relationships to be challenged. The territorial emphasis and wide scope allows innovative conclusions to be drawn about the comparative development of the nobility in different geographical areas.

PASE Domesday – The Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England Domesday Book Database
PASE Domesday is a database linked to mapping facilities designed to facilitate the identification of English landholders in Domesday Book.

Prosopography of the Byzantine World
This online database aims to provide a complete prosopography for the Byzantine world in the eleventh and twelfth centuries (c. 1025-1180), continuing chronologically the scope of the PmBZ.

Prosopography of the Middle Byzantine Period
The Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of sciences and humanities project “Prosopographie der mittelbyzantinischen Zeit (= PmbZ)” (Prosopography of the Middle-Byzantine Period) aims at creating a biographical dictionary for all people who lived in the Byzantine Empire between 641AD and 1025AD or were in contact with the Empire and are mentioned in the sources of that period. The individual articles offer the reader a summary of a person’s biography (where possible) and state all sources pertaining to this person. For technical reasons, the period covered by the PmbZ was divided into two sections (“Abteilungen”): the first running from 641 to 867, the second from 867 to 1025.

Religions

Analecta Cartusiana
Since 1970 the Analecta Cartusiana has been the sole international series on the Carthusian Order, with more than 290 volumes having been published. This website includes some 100 links to Carthusian related websites, up-to-date bibliographical information, upcoming colloquia and much more.

ArchNet 
ArchNet is an international online community for architects, planners, urban designers, landscape architects, conservationists, and scholars, with a focus on Muslim cultures and civilizations.

BIBLindex: Références bibliques dans la littérature patristique
An online catalogue of over 400,000 biblical references found in Greek and Latin patristrics from the first through fifth centuries.

Christian Classics Ethereal Library
Searchable database of Christian writing from the earliest period onwards.

The Database of Jewish Epigraphy 
Epidat – The Database of Jewish epigraphy – provides the inventory, documentation, editing and presentation of epigraphic collections. Currently available online are 199 digital editions with 35,529 tombs.

Database of the Letters of Pope Gregory VII 
The main purpose of this database is to provide information on how and where the letters of Pope Gregory VII (1073-1085) were transmitted, used and copied.

Digital Mishnah
This site accompanies and hosts the development of a born-digital critical edition of the Mishnah. When fully implemented, the project will provide a dynamic edition of the Mishnah that takes advantage of its medium to provide multiple and customizable presentations of the text, as well as analytical tools that will allow the user to study variability between witnesses as well as other features. The site also hosts a demo of the online Mishnah and a blog tracing the ongoing development of the project.

Ecclesiastical Calendar
Calculates the ecclesiastical calendar for years after AD 325, for New and Old Orthodox Calendars and the Western Calendar. Also contains a list of Orthodox and Western Easter dates listed in the Julian Calendar or the Gregorian Calendar, 1875-2124, and a table of the frequency of the difference between the dates of Orthodox and Western Easter, AD 1583 to AD 3000. (This site is no longer active, but the archive is visible at this address.)

Guide to Early Church Texts
This site contains pointers to online files relating to the early church, including canonical documents, creeds, the writings of the Apostolic Fathers and other historical texts relevant to church history.

Inscriptions of Palestine
This project seeks to collect and make accessible all of the previously published inscriptions (and their English translations) of Palestine from the Persian period through the Islamic conquest (ca. 500 BCE – 640 CE). There are about 15,000 of these inscriptions, written primarily in Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek and Latin, by Jews, Christians, Greeks, and Romans. They range from imperial declarations on monumental architecture to notices of donations in synagogues to humble names scratched on ossuaries, and include everything in between. There are approximately 2,500 inscriptions currently in the database, with more added regularly. Inscriptions of Palestine is an ongoing project at Brown University.

Khazaria 
A Resource for Turkic and Jewish History in Russia and Ukraine.

Monastic Manuscript Project
The Monastic Manuscript Project is a database of descriptions of manuscripts that contain texts relevant for the study of early medieval monasticism, especially monastic rules, ascetic treatises, vitae patrum-texts and texts related to monastic reforms. The Project provides lists of manuscripts for each of these texts, which are linked to manuscript descriptions. The purpose is to offer a tool for reconstructing not only the manuscript dissemination of early medieval monastic texts but also to give access to the specific contexts in which a text appears.

Monastic Matrix
A scholarly resource for the study of women’s religious communities from 400 to 1600 CE.

Monastic Wales
In an attempt to identify more firmly Wales’s place on the monastic map of Europe, this new large-scale project seeks to establish a comprehensive monastic history of medieval Wales, the findings of which will be made available to scholars and students, as well as to the wider public, both electronically and in print.

Oseney Abbey Studies
Online book on Oseney Abbey. People are invited to download the book for free at the URL above, where you will find details of the content, file types available (.pdf and .lyx) and the size of the files. Unfortunately, the front cover and back cover are not available to users from outside the University of Leicester.

Rete Vitae Religiosae Mediaevalis Studia Conectens
The international research in the field of medieval monasteries and religious orders is hard to grasp, particularly since it is scattered in many individual research centres. It is difficult to focus even on a specific order, and this in spite of the fact that a comparative approach towards the history of medieval religious orders is still a desideratum even in modern research. With RE.VI.RE.S we hope to provide a helpful tool to solve this problem.

TRADITIO: Studies in Ancient and Medieval Thought, History and Religion
Website of Traditio, journal for medieval studies produced by Fordham University. Has links to full-text articles, organized geographically and chronologically.

Troubadours, Trouveres and the Crusades 
The crusades have left a profound and disturbing legacy in inter-cultural and inter-faith relations nationally and worldwide. They continue to be of compelling interest and relevance to students, scholars and the wider public, with crusading rhetoric alive in the global political discourse transmitted daily in the media. A four-year Anglo-Italian project, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council of the UK, will allow academic researchers and teachers, school-teachers, students, and any interested member of the general public to access and exploit original source material. Some 200 texts will be made freely accessible and downloadable online in high-quality editions, and will be translated into both English and Italian.

Vetus Latina
Resources for the study of the old Latin Bible.

Wabash Center Guide to Internet Resources for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion 
A selective, annotated guide to a wide variety of electronic resources of interest to those who are involved in the study and practice of religion: syllabi, electronic texts, electronic journals, websites, bibliographies, listserv discussion groups, liturgies, reference resources, software, etc.

Theory and the Middle Ages

Babel Working Group
The BABEL Working Group is a non-hierarchical scholarly collective and post-institutional desiring-assemblage with no leaders or followers, no top and no bottom, and only a middle. Membership in the BWG carries with it no fees, no obligations, and no hassles, and accrues to its members all the symbolic capital they need for whatever meanings they require. BABEL’s chief commitment is the cultivation of a more mindful being-together with others who work alongside us in the ruined towers of the post-historical university. BABEL roams and stalks these ruins as a multiplicity, a pack, not of subjects but of singularities without identity or unity, looking for other roaming packs and multiplicities with which to cohabit and build glittering misfit heterotopias. More conventionally, the BABEL Working Group, founded in 2004, is a collective and desiring-assemblage of scholars (primarily medievalists, but also persons working in other areas, such as early modern and Victorian studies, critical and cultural theory, film and women’s studies, new media studies, critical sexuality studies, and so on) in North America, the U.K., Australia, and beyond who are working to develop new cross-disciplinary alliances between the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and the fine arts in order to formulate and practice new critical humanisms, as well as to develop a more present-minded medieval studies, a more historically-minded cultural studies, and a new misfit multiversity.

Material Collective
The Material Collective is dedicated to fostering respectful intellectual exchange and innovative scholarship in the study of the visual arts, in the academy, and in the broader, public sphere, with the belief that excellent scholarship can grow out of collaboration, experimentation, and play. The Material Collective works to create spaces where scholars from many different backgrounds, both traditional and non-traditional, can come together for mutual enrichment. By encouraging work that explores new modes of thinking about art and culture while recognizing the many insights of the past, scholarship can celebrate its relationship with contemporary society, while fostering concerns with the ethical and moral challenges of the present day, even as it seeks to shed light on the past.

MEARCSTAPA (Monsters: The Experimental Association for the Research of Cryptozoology through Scholarly Theory and Practical Application)
MEARCSTAPA is an organization committed to the scholarly examination of monstrosity as an area of social and cultural interest to past and present societies. Our inter/trans/post/pre-disciplinary approach allows us to explore the significance of monstrosity across cultural, temporal, and geographic boundaries. We are interested in a multivalent approach using materials on monsters and monstrosity from literary, artistic, philosophical, and historical sources.

Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum
An evolving database of the entire corpus of Latin music theory written during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Topography

City Witness: Medieval Swansea
A thriving port, a marcher base for the lords of Gower, and a multi-cultural urban community, Swansea was an important centre in the Middle Ages, comparable with many other historic European towns. Yet the medieval legacy of Swansea is almost invisible today. This project aims to further our understanding of medieval Swansea, to forge connections between the modern city and its medieval antecedent, and through digital mapping and textual analysis to reveal how medieval individuals from different cultural and ethnic communities understood and represented their town.

Digital Mappaemundi
DM is an environment for the study and annotation of images and texts. It is a suite of tools, enabling scholars to gather and organize the evidence necessary to support arguments based in digitized resources. DM enables users to mark fragments of interest in manuscripts, print materials, photographs, etc. and provide commentary on these resources and the relationships among them. A principle objective of this project is to continue to develop our understanding of scholarly work processes in order to effectively support research as it is practised now, while opening the door for new methods of scholarship to emerge.

Forests and Chases of England and Wales c. 1000 to c. 1850
The purpose of the project is to raise awareness of, and excite interest in, the proposal to conduct systematic groundwork towards a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary investigation of the medieval and post-medieval spatial, temporal, functional, and cultural survival and significance of the Forests and Chases of England and Wales. Data exists in documents, maps and plans, literature, and fieldwork.

Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
The TGN is a structured vocabulary currently containing around 1,102,000 names and other information about places. Names for a place may include names in the vernacular language, English, other languages, historical names, and in natural order and inverted order.

The Global Middle Ages
This is the website of three ambitious initiatives: the Global Middle Ages Project (GMAP, pronounced “g-map”), the Mappamundi cybernetic initiative (“mappamundi” = “map of the world”), and the Scholarly Community for the Globalization of the Middle Ages (SCGMA, pronounced “sigma”). Each initiative brings together a cluster of scholars, universities, institutes, and centers who are working toward the goal of transforming how we see and understand the world across macrohistorical time: a thousand years of history, literature, technology, cultural encounters and crossings, ideas, movement, and change. The gmap site is concerned with the details of the pedagogical project ‘The Global Middle Ages’, mappamundi aims to gather and coordinate the best of online/digital projects scattered across the web and SCGMA is an online site for the scholarly community for the globalization of the Middle Ages.

Latin Place Names
Latin place names found in the imprints of books printed before 1801 and their vernacular equivalents in AACR2; database was complied from the imprint information in cataloguing records of several Anglo-American libraries.

Mapping the Medieval Countryside: Places, People, and Properties in the Inquisitions Post Mortem
Mapping the Medieval Countryside is a major research project dedicated to the online publication of medieval English inquisitions post mortem (IPMs). These inquisitions, which recorded the lands held at their deaths by tenants of the crown, comprise the most extensive and important body of source material for landholding in medieval England. They describe the lands held by thousands of families, from nobles to peasants, and are a key source for the history of almost every settlement in England (and of many in Wales). They are indispensable to local and family historians as well as to academic specialists in areas in diverse as agrarian history and political society. The project will publish a searchable English translation of the IPMs covering the periods 1236 to 1447 and 1485 to 1509. From 1399 to 1447 the text will be enhanced to enable sophisticated analysis and mapping of the inquisitions’ contents. The online texts will be accompanied by a wealth of commentary and interpretation to enable all potential users to use this source easily and effectively.

Mapping the Realm 
English cartographic constructions of fourteenth-century Britain.

Orbis Latinus
Resource for medieval place-names. A digitization of the 1909 source, this will reflect the geographical and political reality of that time. For more detailed information, please consult the more recent multi-volume edition: Johann Georg Theodor Grässe, Orbis Latinus; Lexikon lateinischer geographischer Namen des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit (Braunschweig: Klinkhardt & Biermann, 1972).

Periodical Historical Atlas of Europe
Atlas with 21 maps depicting Europe at the end of each century from AD 1 to AD 2000.

The Roads of Roman Britain  
This website, launched by the Roman Roads Research Association in Spring 2018, provides a comprehensive online resource focusing on Roman roads in Britain. Covering all of Britain’s Roman roads, the Gazetteer, when completed, will be the first survey of Britain’s Roman Roads since Ivan Margary’s final edition of Roman Roads in Britain in 1973, now woefully out of date and often inaccurate. The Association aims to provide an up to date evaluation of each Roman road and, since new discoveries are being made all the time, this online resource provides flexibility to make amendments and additions. A fully up to date interactive map is currently under development.

Rockingham Forest Trust Resource Centre
The Forest lies in the county of Northamptonshire, England. These web pages provide a unique insight in to the changing character of the rural historic landscape of Rockingham Forest from the medieval period through to the late 19th century. The evidence presented shows how much of what we value in the present landscape originated, which is essential to understanding how to conserve it. The website includes maps of the forest and surrounding area over time, a short history, and aerial photographs of the area.

The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World
Spanning one-ninth of the earth’s circumference across three continents, the Roman Empire ruled a quarter of humanity through complex networks of political power, military domination and economic exchange. These extensive connections were sustained by premodern transportation and communication technologies that relied on energy generated by human and animal bodies, winds, and currents. Conventional maps that represent this world as it appears from space signally fail to capture the severe environmental constraints that governed the flows of people, goods and information. Cost, rather than distance, is the principal determinant of connectivity. For the first time, ORBIS expresses Roman communication costs in terms of both time and expense. By simulating movement along the principal routes of the Roman road network, the main navigable rivers, and hundreds of sea routes in the Mediterranean, Black Sea and coastal Atlantic, this interactive model reconstructs the duration and financial cost of travel in antiquity. Taking account of seasonal variation and accommodating a wide range of modes and means of transport, ORBIS reveals the true shape of the Roman world and provides a unique resource for our understanding of premodern history.